Showing 29 results

Authority record
Corporate body

A Space

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/151009462
  • Corporate body
  • 1971-

A Space is an artist-run centre located in Toronto.

Art Directors Club, Toronto

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/1918145857118222922442
  • Corporate body
  • 1947-1993

The Art Directors Club, Toronto (active 1947–1993), now the Advertising and Design Club of Canada, was a trade organization the first aim of which was “to promote the use of better art as applied to commerce and industry.” Its membership, initially around 25 and limited in 1958 to 90 members, consisted chiefly of art directors, commercial artists, photographers and typographers. After its charter was granted in January 1948, the club elected Robin Cumine, Leslie Trevor, John Belknap, O.K. Schenk and Eric Heathcote as officers for 1948–1949. Harry Caverhill, Charles Comfort, Stanley Cooper and Leslie Wookey served on the first executive committee. Presidents of the Art Directors Club, Toronto mentioned in club correspondence were Leslie Trevor and Gerald Moses. Similar organizations existed in Vancouver, Montreal, New York and elsewhere.
The first Art Directors Club, Toronto (ADCT) exhibition was held at Eatons Fine Art Galleries in Toronto in April 1949. In that year, the club first published reproductions of submissions to the exhibition in its Annual of advertising and editorial art (1949–1964). Issues of the annual included lists of artists in the exhibition and names of members of the club.
The club also administered the Oscar Cahén Memorial Award for accomplishment in the art of industry and commerce, named after Canadian painter (member of the Painters Eleven) and illustrator Oscar Cahén (1916–1956).
During the 1950s, ADCT exhibitions of advertising and editorial art were held at the Art Gallery of Toronto, now the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO).

Art Gallery of Ontario

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/151879312
  • Corporate body
  • 1900-

The Gallery was first incorporated in July 1900 as the Art Museum of Toronto. The name was changed to the Art Gallery of Toronto by a statute law amendment act, assented to 24 April 1919. It was thought that the word “Museum” conflicted with the Royal Ontario Museum which was founded in 1912. The current name of the Gallery took effect July 8, 1966 when The Art Gallery of Ontario Act, 1966 received royal assent. The name change was designed to acknowledge the rapidly growing role the Gallery played across the province.

Art Institute of Ontario

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/137129463
  • Corporate body
  • 1951-1968

The Art Institute of Ontario (AIO) was officially incorporated in 1951 to organize and circulate exhibitions, lectures, and instructional programmes throughout the province of Ontario with the help of its institutional members. The AIO’s founding members were the Art Gallery of Toronto (now Art Gallery of Ontario, the Art Gallery of Hamilton, the Art Gallery of London, Hart House, the London Public Library and Art Museum, the National Gallery of Canada, The Ontario Association of Architects, The Ontario Society of Artists, The Royal Ontario Museum, and The Willistead Art Gallery of Windsor. A proposal to form the AIO was originally put forward as early as September 1948 by the Art Gallery of Toronto, which had begun circulating exhibitions. However, funding was not formalized until 1951 when a grant from the Ontario Ministry of Education made it possible to sponsor an exhibition circulating throughout the province. In later years the AIO would also receive funding from the Atkinson foundation, Canada Council (since its founding in 1957), and the Province of Ontario Council for the Arts.

Harold C. Walker (President of the AGT from 1948-1950) originally served as the AIO’s Chairman while Martin Baldwin (Director of the AGT from 1948-1960) was its Director until 1964, when Paul Bennett took over the role (Baldwin stayed on as President). Bennett had previously been hired as the AIO’s first Field Director in 1959, serving as Director until the institute was absorbed into the AGO’s Extension Services in 1968.

Canada Packers

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/159509315
  • Corporate body
  • 1927-1990

Canada Packers, Inc. (now Maple Leaf Foods, Inc.) was a Toronto-based meat packing and processing company.

The company was formed out of a succession of mergers with predecessor companies. These include the William Davies Company, Ltd. (est. 1854), the Canadian Packing Company, Ltd. (est. 1868 as the George Matthews Company), Gunns Ltd. (est. 1876), and the Harris Abattoir Company, Ltd. (est. 1896). These firms merged in 1927 to form Canada Packers, Ltd., which became Canada Packers Inc. in 1980. In 1990 Canada Packers Inc. merged with British based Maple Leaf Mills, Ltd. to form Maple Leaf Foods, Inc.

Canadian Art Club (Toronto, Ont.)

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/132456435
  • Corporate body
  • 1907-1915

The Canadian Art Club was a Toronto-based exhibiting society active from 1907 to 1915. The club brought together the work of most of the leading Canadian painters and sculptors of the day, largely from Toronto and Montreal but also from abroad, for its annual exhibitions. It was formed by seceding members of the Ontario Society of Artists who rejected what they perceived as that group’s parochialism and low artistic standards. Among the founding artist members were W.E. Atkinson, Archibald Browne, Franklin Brownell, Edmund Morris, Homer Watson (first president of the club) and Curtis Williamson. The artists were soon supported by a considerable number of members who were not artists (referred to as ‘lay members’ in documents). Part of the club’s purpose was to encourage expatriate Canadian artists, such as J. W. Morrice and Clarence Gagnon, to associate with the club and to exhibit in Canada. It succeeded in affording sympathetic reception in Toronto for prominent Quebec artists of the time, like Marc-Aurèle de Foy Suzor-Coté. After the death in 1913 of Edmund Morris, honorary secretary and chief organizer, the club declined amid disputes between members until it ceased to function in 1915. The Canadian Art Club was formally dissolved about 1933.

Centre for Experimental Art & Communication

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/130476278
  • Corporate body
  • 1975-1980

An offshoot of the Kensington Art Association, CEAC was founded in 1975. In 1976 it moved to 86 John Street and then to 15 Duncan Street, offering space for performance art, installations, videos and music. Key members of the group were Amerigo Marras, Suber Corley, Bruce Eves and Ron Gillespie (a.k.a Ron Giii); Marras in particular encouraged connections with European and American artists. The group became increasingly politicized and in 1978 its government funding was rescinded. An attempt at self-sufficiency by starting a television production studio at 124 Lisgar Street was not sustainable and CEAC disbanded in 1980.

Chromazone (Group of artists)

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/139480346
  • Corporate body
  • 1981-1985

The ChromaZone/Chromatique Collective was a collaborative group of emerging Canadian artists that created and exhibited art in Toronto between 1981 and 1985. The Collective was founded in 1981 and consisted of six members: Andy Fabo, Sybil Goldstein, Oliver Girling, Tony Wilson, H.P. Marti and Rae Johnson.

Between September 1981 and May 1983, the collective operated out of their gallery space ChromaZone/ Chromatique, located at 320 Spadina Ave, Toronto. Their inaugural exhibition Mondo Chroma opened in September 1981. Between 1981 and May 1983, the Collective mounted 45 varying cultural events including exhibitions, poetry readings, banquets and fashion shows. In 1982, the Collective published their first publication ChromaZone/Chromatique (Prototype), and participated in Monumenta, a collaboration among four galleries, including ChromaZone/Chromatique, which showcased current representational art in Toronto through the work of 75 artists. In December 1982, the Collective curated and participated in OKROMAZONE - Die Anderen Von Kanada held at the Institut Unzeit in West Berlin as a direct reaction to the Canadian Government’s OKanada cultural festival in Berlin. This exhibition featured the work of 22 contemporary Toronto artists.

In May 1983, the Collective closed their gallery space to give the members more time to focus on their own work and larger collective projects. In October, the Collective exhibited together at the Norman MacKenzie Art Gallery in Regina and later that month opened Chromaliving, a month-long exhibition of 150 artists in the vacant 10,000 square feet space at 131 Bloor St. W, Toronto, recently vacated by the Harridges Department store. This exhibition, co-curated by Tim Jocelyn and Andy Fabo, sought to showcase the merging of art and lifestyle and featured furniture, fashion and painting. In 1984, the group continued to present exhibitions including Kromalaffin, a show of comic book art (Grunwald Gallery, Toronto); ChromaZone/Chromatique, a traveling exhibition of members’ work (Concordia University and other venues across Quebec); Cross OT: Seven From Berlin, Berlin Super 8 and Berlin Video (several venues in Toronto); and Painting Beyond the Zone, a group exhibition of 30 emerging artists (Artists Resource Centre, Toronto).

In 1985, members of the Collective largely moved away from Toronto with Andy Fabo, Tim Jocelyn and Sybil Goldstein relocating to New York City, and H.P. Marti moving to Zurich. ChromaZone’s final exhibition Fire + Ice was an exchange of Toronto and Zurich artists held at Galerie Walcheturm in Zurich. The Collective officially disbanded in 1986, after the death of Tim Jocelyn from AIDS in December of that year. Sybil Goldstein founded and chaired the Tim Jocelyn Art Foundation after his death.

Experiments in Art and Technology

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/148900320
  • Corporate body
  • 1966-2000s

Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T.) was founded in September, 1966 as a not-for-profit organization to promote cooperation among artists, engineers and industry on projects involving both art and technology. Members included Billy Klüver, Robert Rauschenberg, Robert Whitman, Fred Waldhauer, among many others. In 1977 the documents of E.A.T. were assembled, reproduced, and distributed to several libraries and museums throughout the world.

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